Rabat, Morocco – In France, there was a harsh reaction from Morocco to encourage the dissemination of cartoons insulting the Prophet Muhammad in an Anti-Islam Campaign.

Macron will lose! He declared war on Islam!

Macron, who recently made his hostile attitude towards Muslims public, also reflected his hostility towards Islam to his official institutions.

The cartoons published by the French magazine Charlie Hebdo and attempted to insult our beloved Prophet Muhammad were reflected on government buildings in the cities of Montpellier and Toulouse last night. This immorality, which Macron openly supports, has been added to France’s record of Islamophobia as one of the biggest disgrace. On the other hand, reaction and boycott decisions come one after another from the Muslims of the world.

Condemnation and boycott actions from the Islamic geography to France are increasing. The Organization of Islamic Cooperation and Kuwait condemned France. Morocco and Qatar also boycotted French products. The Organization of Islamic Cooperation condemned France’s immoral attitude. The statement said, “We condemn the constant systematic attack on the feelings of Muslims by insulting the religious symbols represented by the person of the Prophet Muhammed.”

The dishonor of the immoral French government, which is an enemy of Islam, “officially” was met with great reaction from the Muslims of the world. French magazine Charlie Hebdo was attacked in January 2015 for publishing the dishonor in question, and many editors and illustrators of the magazine were killed. Recently, a French teacher, an enemy of Islam, showed the cartoons in the classroom as “freedom of expression” to the students, and after this immorality, he was beheaded and killed.

French President Emmanuel Macron, the enemy of Islam, declared the teacher who was killed for insulting the Master of the Universe our prophet Mohammad as a “hero”, and the pressure on Muslim non-governmental organizations and mosques in France increased after the incident.

The Kuwait Ministry of Foreign Affairs warned that political rhetoric that would create hatred, hatred and violence could have dire consequences.

In Morocco, activists changed their profile photos on social media and replaced them with the text “Muhammad Rasulullah”. They started a boycott of French goods and called on all Muslims to join the boycott. The Federation of Kuwait Consumer Associations has also launched a massive campaign to withdraw French products from associations, the country’s largest market, in response. Markets in Qatar have started to remove French goods from shelves.

Markets in Qatar have started to remove French goods from shelves.

In response to the publication of cartoons insulting Muhammad, markets in Qatar started collecting French goods in all of their branches. Qatar University also postponed the French Culture Week event in response to France.

In a statement, the Moroccan Foreign Ministry said the Prophet, discomfort with the publication of Muhammad’s cartoons was expressed.

The statement, which strongly condemned the publication of cartoons insulting the Prophet Muhammad and Islam, said that one’s freedom ends where the freedom and beliefs of others begin.

The statement also said that insults and incitements to Islam, which is the religion of more than 2 billion people, cannot be free of expression for whatever reason.

The campaign, launched by Moroccans on Friday with the label “Boycott French Products,” has received a lot of attention on social media. In Morocco, a large segment is boycotting French products.

French cartoons provocative to Islam, beliefs, says Morocco.

Macron’s remarks about Islam sparks widespread condemnation in Arab world.

Turkey on Saturday slammed France for publishing cartoons that degrade Islamic symbols.

French President Emmanuel Macron’s encouragement to publish insulting cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, is an attempt to revive the Crusades where France was the source of its debut.

Publishing the cartoons was provocative to the feelings of the Islamic Nation and an aggression on its religion and beliefs.

Publishing the insulting cartoons of Prophet Muhammad, along with Macron’s remarks about Islam and the Muslim community, sparked widespread condemnation in the Arab world on the official and other levels with official statements decrying his remarks.

Activists launched boycott campaigns against French products in several Arab countries.

Arabs condemn French insults of Islam, Prophet Muhammad

Macron attacked Islam and Muslim community, accusing Muslims of “separatism”

Several Arab countries have condemned the French incitement against the Islamic religion and the Prophet Muhammad, warning that these repeated insults fuel hatred among the peoples.

In recent weeks, French President Emmanuel Macron attacked Islam and the Muslim community, accusing Muslims of “separatism”. He described Islam as a “a religion in crisis all over the world”.

This coincided with a provocative move by Charlie Hebdo, a left-wing French magazine infamous for publishing anti-Islamic caricatures, which have drawn widespread anger and outrage across the Muslim world.

The caricatures were first published in 2006 by a Danish newspaper Jylllands Posten, sparking a wave of protests.

In a statement, the Secretary General of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Nayef al-Hajraf described Macron’s statements against Islam as “irresponsible” and “cause to spread the culture of hatred among the peoples”.

“Such French statements come out at a time when efforts are underway to enhance tolerance and dialogue between cultures and religions,” al-Hajraf said in a statement.

Dhaifallah Fayez, a spokesman for Jordan’s Foreign Ministry, also voiced his country’s condemnation of republishing the offensive cartoons of the prophet by Charlie Hebdo on claims of freedom of expression.

“Such practices hurt the sentiments of around 2 billion Muslims and amount to an assault on religious symbols, beliefs and sanctities,” he said, going on to warn that such practices cause to fuel the culture of extremism and violence.

Kuwait’s Foreign Ministry also expressed resentment at the French republication of the anti-prophet cartoons.

A ministry statement warned that these insults will “ignite the spirit of hatred, violence and enmity, and jeopardize the international community’s efforts to spread the culture of tolerance and peace among peoples of the world”.

Websites Hacked, Products Banned Over French President Macron’s Anti-Islam Remarks

In recent weeks, French President Emmanuel Macron has attacked Islam and the Muslim community, accusing Muslims of “separatism.” He described Islam as a “a religion in crisis all over the world.”

There has been a tremendous criticism over French President Emmanuel Macron’s critique over the killing of a teacher in Paris by Islamic extremist and his decision not to “give up cartoons” depicting Prophet Mohammed.

Several French websites came under cyber attack Sunday over anti-Islamic remarks by the country’s president and the republication of cartoons insulting Prophet Muhammad.

An anti-malware and support unit account on Twitter said a major cyberattack against French websites was underway. “A wave of cyberattacks has hit French websites Sunday evening,” it said, without elaborating.

French President Emmanuel Macron’s attitude against Islam, the republication of caricatures insulting its Holy Prophet and their projection on the walls of buildings has triggered boycotts of French products in several countries including Qatar, Kuwait, Algeria, Sudan, Palestine and Morocco.

The French Foreign Ministry has called for an end to boycotts and protests against France.

The beheading of a teacher who had shown the controversial cartoons depicting Prophet Muhammad during one of his classes on freedom of expression triggered anti-Islamic remarks in France which also sparked protests in Muslim countries.

In recent days, Macron said they would not stop publishing such cartoons insulting Islamic values.

Morocco Condemns Macron

Morocco on Sunday joined a number of other countries that have condemned the recent republication of French cartoons insulting the Prophet Muhammad.

The country’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement that the systematic publication of such cartoons “reflects the lack of maturity of their perpetrators.”

Strongly denouncing the move, it said the “freedom of an individual ends where the freedom of others and their beliefs begin.”

There has been a tremendous criticism over French President Emmanuel Macron’s critique over the killing of a teacher in Paris by Islamic extremist and his decision not to “give up cartoons” depicting Prophet Mohammed.

Several French websites came under cyber attack Sunday over anti-Islamic remarks by the country’s president and the republication of cartoons insulting Prophet Muhammad.

An anti-malware and support unit account on Twitter said a major cyberattack against French websites was underway. “A wave of cyberattacks has hit French websites Sunday evening,” it said, without elaborating.

French President Emmanuel Macron’s attitude against Islam, the republication of caricatures insulting its Holy Prophet and their projection on the walls of buildings has triggered boycotts of French products in several countries including Qatar, Kuwait, Algeria, Sudan, Palestine and Morocco.

The French Foreign Ministry has called for an end to boycotts and protests against France.

The beheading of a teacher who had shown the controversial cartoons depicting Prophet Muhammad during one of his classes on freedom of expression triggered anti-Islamic remarks in France which also sparked protests in Muslim countries.

In recent days, Macron said they would not stop publishing such cartoons insulting Islamic values.

Morocco Condemns Macron

Morocco on Sunday joined a number of other countries that have condemned the recent republication of French cartoons insulting the Prophet Muhammad.

The country’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement that the systematic publication of such cartoons “reflects the lack of maturity of their perpetrators.”

Strongly denouncing the move, it said the “freedom of an individual ends where the freedom of others and their beliefs begin.”

It added that freedom of expression cannot explain the attacks and provocations on Islam, a religion with nearly 2 billion adherents worldwide.

Meanwhile, people continue to support a boycott of French products that was launched through social media campaigns across Morocco.

In recent weeks, French President Emmanuel Macron has attacked Islam and the Muslim community, accusing Muslims of “separatism.” He described Islam as “a religion in crisis all over the world.”

This coincided with a provocative move by Charlie Hebdo, a left-wing French satirical magazine infamous for publishing anti-Islamic caricatures which have drawn widespread anger and outrage across the Muslim world.

Earlier this year, it republished cartoons insulting Islam and Prophet Muhammad.

The caricatures were first published in 2006 by the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, sparking a wave of protests.

Arab Christians Slam Macron

Arab Christians on Sunday joined those condemning recent statements by French authorities against Islam and Prophet Muhammad.

On Wednesday, French President Emmanuel Macron said he will not prevent the publishing of insulting cartoons of Prophet Muhammad under the pretext of freedom of expression, a statement that sparked outrage in the Arab and Muslim world.

Jalal Chahda, a senior anchor with the Qatar-based Al-Jazeera news channel, said in a tweet: “I am Jalal Chahda, an Arab Levantine Christian, and I strongly reject and denounce the insult to the Prophet of Islam, the Messenger #Mohammad. Blessings and peace.”

Chahda also attached a photo, saying: “Muhammad, may God bless him and grant him peace.”

It was followed by comments from his Muslim colleagues praising the tweet. Ghada Owais, another Al-Jazeera presenter who is also Christian, re-tweeted Chahda’s tweet, saying: “I refuse to hurt the feelings of Muslims or to generalize terrorism and link it to Islam.”

A Twitter user named Ayman Dababneh said: “Who offends and does not respect my Muslim brothers does not respect me as a Jordanian Christian,” he also attached a photo saying “I am Christian against Islam abuse.”

Michael Ayoub said on Twitter: “I really despise the person who insults the religion of another or mocks him or his messengers.” “What happened in France was a degeneration, and this underscores that they are very far from the teachings of the Bible.”

Raymond Maher wrote on his Twitter account that, “Since yesterday, all that I see in my Facebook newsfeed are posts for Christians who condemn insulting Prophet Muhammad, and that’s how our nature is in Egypt. We are one Muslims and Christians. ”

On Facebook, dozens of Christians including “Fathi Daniel” and “Wael Elbatl” posted pictures with similar comments which were accompanied by praise from Muslims.

Egyptian lawyer Nevin Malak also tweeted under the hashtag ‘#Against insulting the prophet’ quoting some of the teachings of the Bible that call for respecting other religions.

Over the past few days, France has witnessed the posting of insulting pictures and drawings of the Prophet Muhammad on the facades of some buildings in the country.

Besides the provocative cartoons, earlier this month, President Macron described Islam as a religion “in crisis” and announced plans for tougher laws to tackle what he called “Islamist separatism” in France.

French Muslims have accused him of trying to repress their religion and legitimizing Islamophobia.

Several Arab countries, as well as Turkey and Pakistan, have also condemned Macron’s attitude toward Muslims and Islam, with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan saying the French leader needs a “mental health check.”

The head of France’s far-right National Front party called Sunday for a nationwide ban on the wearing of Muslim headscarves in public spaces.

Marine Le Pen made the comments while answering reporters’ questions on the “Grand Jury” TV program.

Le Pen underlined that there has been a rapid increase in the number of women wearing headscarves in France since 1989, adding “the veil has accompanied the rise of Islamism in our country.”

She claimed that a “war” is being waged against the country and they should respond.

“We declare this war against not a state, but an ideology — Islamism,” she added.

Arguing that the Islamist ideology should be seen as the enemy of France, Le Pen called for the prohibition of organizations supporting it, the closure of mosques and the deporting of foreigners.

On France’s recalling its ambassador in Ankara following remarks by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan about his French counterpart, she said it was an important but not strong reaction.

The Turkish president said: “What is Macron’s problem with Islam? What is his problem with Muslims? He needs a mental health check. What else can we say to a president who does not understand freedom of belief and behaves in this way to millions of people living in his country who are members of a different faith?”

France urges Arab nations to prevent boycotts over Macron’s cartoons defense.

France has urged Middle Eastern countries to end calls for a boycott of its goods in protest at President Emmanuel Macron’s defence of the right to show cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad.

The French foreign ministry said the “baseless” calls for a boycott were being “pushed by a radical minority”.

French products have been removed from some shops in Kuwait, Jordan and Qatar.

Meanwhile, protests have been seen in Libya, Syria and the Gaza Strip.

The backlash stems from comments made by Mr Macron after the gruesome murder of a French teacher who showed cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in class.

The president said the teacher, Samuel Paty, “was killed because Islamists want our future”, but France would “not give up our cartoons”

Depictions of the Prophet Muhammad can cause serious offence to Muslims because Islamic tradition explicitly forbids images of Muhammad and Allah (God).

But state secularism – or laïcité – is central to France’s national identity. Curbing freedom of expression to protect the feelings of one particular community, the state says, undermines unity.

On Sunday, Mr Macron doubled down on his defence of French values in a tweet that read: “We will not give in, ever.”

Political leaders in Turkey and Pakistan have rounded on Mr Macron, accusing him of not respecting “freedom of belief” and marginalising the millions of Muslims in France.

On Sunday, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan suggested, for a second time, that Mr Macron should seek “mental checks” for his views on Islam.

Similar comments prompted France to recall its ambassador to Turkey for consultations on Saturday.

How widespread is the boycott on French products?

Some supermarket shelves had been stripped of French products in Jordan, Qatar and Kuwait by Sunday. French-made hair and beauty items, for example, were not on display.

In Kuwait, a major retail union has ordered a boycott of French goods.

The non-governmental Union of Consumer Co-operative Societies said it had issued the directive in response to “repeated insults” against the Prophet Muhammad.

In a statement, the French foreign ministry acknowledged the moves, writing: “These calls for boycott are baseless and should stop immediately, as well as all attacks against our country, which are being pushed by a radical minority.”

Online, calls for similar boycotts in other Arab countries, such as Saudi Arabia, have been circulating.

A hashtag calling for the boycott of French supermarket chain Carrefour was the second-most trending topic in Saudi Arabia, the Arab world’s largest economy.

Meanwhile, small anti-French protests were held in Libya, Gaza and northern Syria, where Turkish-backed militias exert control.

Why is France embroiled in this row?

Mr Macron’s robust defence of French secularism and criticism of radical Islam in the wake of Mr Paty’s killing has angered some in the Muslim world.

Turkey’s Mr Erdogan asked in a speech: “What’s the problem of the individual called Macron with Islam and with the Muslims?”

Meanwhile Pakistani leader Imran Khan accused the French leader of “attacking Islam, clearly without having any understanding of it”.

“President Macron has attacked and hurt the sentiments of millions of Muslims in Europe & across the world,” he tweeted.

French Muslims fear state aims to control their faith

Earlier this month, before the teacher’s killing, Mr Macron had already announced plans for tougher laws to tackle what he called “Islamist separatism” in France.

He said a minority of France’s estimated six million Muslims were in danger of forming a “counter-society”, describing Islam as a religion “in crisis”.

Cartoons caricaturing the Islamic prophet have a dark and intensely political legacy in France.

In 2015, 12 people were killed in an attack on the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, which had published the cartoons.

Some in Western Europe’s largest Muslim community have accused Mr Macron of trying to repress their religion and say his campaign risks legitimising Islamophobia.

Reprinting the Charlie Hebdo cartoons is not about free speech |Asma Barlas is a retired professor of politics in New York

It is about using speech to reaffirm domination

French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo is at it, again: it has chosen to republish the derogatory cartoons of Prophet Muhammad which provoked a violent attack against it in 2015. The editors say it is “essential” to reprint these on the eve of the trial of the perpetrators of that violence.

A decade earlier, in 2005, the Danish newspaper Morgenavisen Jyllands-Posten also published a dozen defamatory cartoons of the prophet which it then republished three years later.

It was the printing of these cartoons that ultimately provoked some Muslims to resort to violence and, as is customary, it was their backlash that became the nub of the “cartoon controversy”.

The original affront to Muslim religious sensibilities was swallowed up by assertions of the cartoonists’ right to free speech and to engage in humour. In fact, in most critics’ views, it was not just the cartoonists who were victimised by “Islamic rage,” but also the principle of free speech itself.

However, it should be possible to condemn violence by Muslims without giving a free pass to those who defame and vilify their religion, their prophet and their scripture. Yet, this rarely happens.

Instead, the Muslim-baiting intelligentsia relies on precisely its own vilifications to incite the violence which it then feigns to be horrified and surprised by. I say feigns because, by now, pretty much everyone knows that, goaded to a point, some Muslims will respond violently to caricatures of their prophet as a terrorist, among other things. I also say feigns because provocateurs require such a response to anathematise all Muslims as a threat to European identities and values.

If it is easy enough to understand why some Muslims respond violently to derogatory tropes about Islam, the prophet and the Quran, what does it say about those who compulsively keep recycling these? I have speculated about this need at length elsewhere but will make only some brief points here.

First, it is difficult to see how anyone – not only a Muslim – could find a cartoon of the prophet as a terrorist/suicide bomber amusing without also treating terrorism itself lightly. After all, how many of us can laugh at a cartoon of a suicide bomber, irrespective of who that person is supposed to be? As for the purported irony of such representations of the prophet, what is satirical about these, when Muslims are already viewed as born terrorists-in-the-making?

Second, European vilifications of the prophet and Islam have a much older pedigree than free speech and have nothing to do with humour. To be precise, they have their roots in medieval Europe and the changing self-conceptions of Christians over a millennium.

For instance, Tomaz Mastnak, a historian of the Crusades, argues that it was in the mid-ninth century when Western unity began to express itself as Christendom, that Muslims also came to be seen as the “normative enemies” of Christianity. Until then, they had been viewed as just another pagan group and generally ignored – even the Muslim conquest of southern Spain did not make it into leading chronicles.

Over time though, Europe’s Christians came to see in Islam not just a “sinister conspiracy against Christianity [but] that total negation of [it] … which would mark the contrivances of Antichrist”. This is how Robert Southern describes it in his book Western Views of Islam in the Middle Ages and he attributes this suspicion to the “strong desire not to know [Islam] for fear of contamination”.

Instead, he says, even the Christians who lived in “the middle of Islam” (Muslim-ruled Andalusia) looked to the Bible to explain it, which is how they came to consider it the Antichrist. In short, according to Southern, it was ignorance and the fear of contamination that made “the existence of Islam the most far-reaching problem in medieval Christendom”.

Given this history, it is not surprising that medieval Christians would also portray the prophet as a heathen idol, the devil, Mahound (as in Salman Rushdie’s Satanic Verses), an imposter, and the Antichrist. He appears in such guises from the Crusades to the Reformation, with his representation as a religious imposter, reaching its literary apotheosis in Italian poet Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy, in which he is confined to the eighth circle of hell.

Two centuries later, he reappears as an Antichrist in the work of German reformist Martin Luther, who of course, believed the pope and the Catholic Church were much worse. A century later, Dutch jurist Hugo Grotius, lauded as the father of international law, was still calling him “a robber” and declaring that, in contrast to the Christians, who “were men who feared God, and led innocent lives … they who first embraced Mahometanism were robbers, and men void of humanity and piety”.

With the coming of the Enlightenment, the prophet’s critics also began assailing him in secular language, as the “worst type of … fanatic” (French writer Voltaire) and “the greatest enemy of reason who ever lived” (German philosopher Immanuel Kant).

Such depictions did not, however, portend a change in his representation as the antithesis of European civilisation. If he was no longer called an Antichrist, in European minds, he was still thought to be outside reason and rationality. This is why I see the cartoons of the prophet as a terrorist to be just a secularisation of the figure of the Antichrist.

Both images serve, equally powerfully, to locate him and, by extension, Islam and Muslims as Europe’s natural enemies. This is why reducing the cartoons to just an issue of free speech obscures their historical and ideological genealogy.

Lastly, (free) speech is conducive not only to critique, humour, honesty, and dissent but also to assertions of dominance and enactments of power. Though power is enacted differently, its exercise is “inseparable from its display”, as American writer Saidiya Hartman argues in her book Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth-Century America.

In the context of slavery in North America, for instance, being able to represent power was “essential to reproducing domination”. As an example, Hartman notes that a slave-holder’s “display of mastery [over a slave] was just as important as the legal title to slave property”. This display usually involved demonstrating the slave holder’s “dominion and the captive’s abasement,” publicly. It also took the less obtrusive form of organising “innocent amusements and spectacles of mastery” as a way for the dominant classes “to establish their dominion” over the enslaved and dominated.

Borrowing from Hartman, I want to suggest that, today, some Westerners seek to demonstrate and reproduce their dominion over Muslims by caricaturing and maligning our sacred symbols at will. They are thus able to achieve epistemically what they cannot physically or legally. Even if this displacement from the physical to the psychological signifies the limits of Western power, speech is integral to its display. This is why derogatory caricatures of the prophet function as spectacles of mastery and as an ideological means to bolster intra-Western unity against Muslims.

It is as much to such enactments of mastery as it is to the content of specific attacks that Muslims like myself react angrily, and what we condemn is not the idea that people should be free to speak but the use of speech to dominate and degrade the already marginal or vulnerable. Defending domination in the name of freedom just confirms that not all conceptions of freedom are equally worth defending.

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